politics is no longer important – the critical issue in D.C. is character

May integrity and uprightness protect me,
    because my hope, Lord, is in you. – Psalm 25:21

img_8032
Derek Maul writes from North Carolina

One of the primary ways I manage to write inspirationally is to keep my heart open to be inspired myself. Reading scripture; listening to life; paying attention to the beauty that surrounds me; listening to music; listening to Rebekah’s messages; reading books, meditations, devotions, and more.

This morning I perused the WFPC “Leaflets” – the weekly newsletter our church circulates every Friday. In it my friend Ray had written this week’s “Officer’s Column,” and he was reflecting on the dynamic, nonstop, irrepressible sense of life that defines our faith community.

Ray mentioned – with enthusiasm – this year’s confirmation class, drawing an important line of connection between the principles, ideals, and vision that gave birth to America, and the critically important work WFPC is doing with children, youth, and families. Here’s a segment from Ray’s letter:

200 years ago the Founding Fathers had this group in mind when they determined the future of the U.S. was dependent on “virtuous people,” describing character and service. In fact, Ben Franklin wrote that nothing is more important than to train youth in wisdom and virtue and added, “…talents for the education of youth are the gift of God…” The Founding Fathers would be pleased with the advisors, mentors and teachers of the Confirmation Class. (WFPC elder Ray Evans)

I’ll write more on the confirmation process after these young people make their public commitment to follow Jesus this Sunday. But this morning I’m thinking about the fact that “the future of this great country is dependent on virtuous people.”

Virtue:

I’m all for the separation of church and state, and I believe America needs to be governed by people of all perspectives and persuasions when it comes to faith, but there is absolutely no substitute for virtue, and character, and integrity, and honesty, and trustworthiness, and incorruptibility… and – to use an extraordinarily powerful word that doesn’t get much mileage nowadays – uprightness.

Uprightness, America! That’s what we need to be talking about.

Let’s not use a litmus test based on political leanings, or social standing, or denominational affiliation, or race, or ethnic background, or “what will you do for me once you’re in power?” Instead, let’s dig a deep moat around the U.S. Capitol and White House, and only let people in via a door marked “Uprightness.”

Granted, politics has been fraught with hypocrisy and corruption and graft and immorality and more since – and including – the Founders back in 1776. But that doesn’t mean we have to like it, or excuse it, or stand for it today!

In everything set them an example by doing what is good. In your teaching show integrity, seriousness and soundness of speech that cannot be condemned, so that those who oppose you may be ashamed because they have nothing bad to say about us. – Titus 2:7-8

Pardon me for sounding idealistic. But isn’t it about time we were? And in’t it past time to place the future of our nation in the hands of women and men who are rooted in virtue, practiced in integrity, and committed to moral uprightness?

I believe it’s a question we must pay attention to – DEREK

One thought on “politics is no longer important – the critical issue in D.C. is character

  1. Amen- I continue to pray for our leaders, especially in Washington D.C. This is a true test of character for those who value “doing what is right” above anything else.It is difficult to watch the t.v. news each day. We are headed to Europe in 2 weeks and wonder if we will be embarrassed to acknowledge to those we meet that we are Americans.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s