113 tons of water, per acre, multiplied by 30 (and that’s just a start)

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on that day all the springs of the great deep burst forth, and the floodgates of the heavens were opened. And rain fell on the earth forty days and forty nights. – Genesis 7

Have you ever spilled a cup of water, or maybe knocked over a half cup of coffee? I do that stuff all the time. The other day I did it with a cup of tea. Well, when you did it I’ll bet you couldn’t believe how far such a little spill goes. I can guarantee you looked at the completely soaked dining room table, or the entire outfit you had to strip off and change because it was now entirely coffee-colored (undergarments too), and said, “All that mess from half a glass?”

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constant rain

Thirty. 30. Yes, 30-inches of rain:

Okay, now imagine 30-inches of rain. Yesterday, 30-inches of rain fell on some parts of North Carolina. One inch of rain – if you were wondering – falling on one acre of ground is equal to about 27,154 gallons of water and weighs about 113 tons – now you do the math. That 30-inches of rain fell in one day, by the way, on an area comprising hundreds of square miles. We could see a repeat of that unprecedented deluge again today and likely in the exact same places. This storm is moving west at a speed of just 2-mph. That’s less than 50-miles in one day.

One inch of rain falling on 1 acre of ground is equal to about 27,154 gallons of water and weighs about 113 tons.

1-IMG_E1069Now look at the satellite image from this morning. We are getting a ton of rain here just north of Raleigh but the hard edge of the monstrous deluge is hovering – see the orange line – just to the south – talk about dodging a literal tidal-wave of flooding. In a hardscaped urban area that hairsbreadth of a miss amounts to the difference between life and death.

So here’s my point (kind of convoluted I’ll admit, given the focus of my introduction), checking in from a very windy and wet Wake Forest: Water can be one of the most dangerous and destructive forces in nature – at the same time we are completely dependent on water for life. It is a truism that what we absolutely need and rely on can also most easily destroy us. We know this, we experience this, we cannot dispute this… yet we play so fast and loose with the most critical resources we have: clean air, water, public health, truth…

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author Derek Maul lives and writes in Wake Forest, NC

In the current political climate, all of these appear to come a distant second to short-term economic gain. Think about it. Think about what our forebearers fought so hard to win for us; don’t you think our right to these – clean air, water, public health, truth  – is inalienable too?

Give it some consideration – DEREK

 

One comment

  1. Dear Derek,

    I have been waiting to hear from you to know how you are getting on, and how your Mum and Dad are coping. I wanted to ring them, especially as it is your Mum’s birthday today. I forgot till this morning that it is her birthday, but as soon as I saw the date I remembered.

    I will try ringing them soon, now that I have heard from you. I have been looking at the news from North Carolina on the computer. It looks as if ‘Florence’ has turned south west – but I understand it is very slow moving. Of course we are praying for you all and trust that there will not be any felling of your many trees.

    Much love from

    Dorothea and John

    >

    Like

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